Make Your Equity Work For You

A home equity loan from Nuline Funding, Inc. can provide you with cash when you need it. Similar to a HELOC, a home equity loan lets you borrow against the equity in your home to receive a lump sum loan.

What Are The Benefits?

  • A fixed interest rate that doesn’t change, so you always know what your monthly payment will be.
  • A variety of amortization periods that let you pay back your loan with favorable terms and conditions.
  • A solution for those with imperfect credit to get access to additional funds.
  • May be an ideal solution for single projects, such as a kitchen remodeling.
  • Interest paid may be tax deductible depending on your situation and the state in which you reside. Not all states may permit this deduction. Consult a tax advisor to make sure you’re eligible.

What Are The Features?

  • A variety of amortization periods
  • More choices for individuals with imperfect credit
  • Fixed interest rates available

Eligibility Requirements

Generally speaking, your credit history and score don’t have a major effect on obtaining a home equity loan because your home secures the loan. Equity in your home will be a key component in determining your available credit. Keep this in mind when considering a home equity loan. Failure to pay could damage your credit standing and result in the loss of your home through foreclosure.

Home Equity Lines of Credit (HELOC)

What Is A HELOC?

A home equity line of credit (HELOC) offers a flexible way to borrow funds. HELOCs differ from traditional home equity loans in that you can draw money from a HELOC as needed instead of taking out a single lump sum loan.

What Are The Benefits?

With a HELOC from Nuline Funding, Inc. you can:

  • Set up emergency access to credit
  • Buy a new car, truck, boat or RV
  • Pay for college tuition
  • Renovate your home
  • Consolidate your bills

How Does A HELOC Work?

A HELOC is a revolving line of credit similar to a credit card. You can borrow funds up to a set credit limit, and interest is charged on the amount borrowed. The revolving credit line can be paid down and reused during your draw term, which typically lasts 5 to 10 years. You’ll only pay interest throughout the draw term. After the draw term is complete, you may either pay the balance in full or pay according to a set schedule (interest must still be paid). You may also refinance the equity line for an additional 5 to 10 years. A home appraisal may be required to obtain a HELOC.

Variable From Top To Bottom

HELOCs offer variable or fixed interest rates that are usually lower than the interest rate on a credit card. Credit limits are also variable and depend on your equity.

Convenient From Open To Close

Closing is easy and may even take place in your own home. You also don’t have to pay closing costs or appraisal fees.

Accessible At All Times

Several options are available to you for accessing cash, including personal withdrawals, check writing and card use.

Flexible For The Future

With a HELOC, you choose how much to borrow and use, as well as how much to repay and when, provided it’s equal to or more than the minimum payment.

Friendly For Your Taxes

Depending on your situation, interest paid on a HELOC may be 100% tax deductible under federal and state income tax laws. Not all states may allow this deduction. Consult a tax advisor to make sure you’re eligible.

Eligibility Requirements

Generally speaking, your credit history and score don’t have a major effect on obtaining a HELOC because your home secures the loan. Equity in your home will be a key component in determining your available credit. When considering a HELOC, remember that the loans are secured by your home. Failure to pay could damage your credit standing and result in the loss of your home through foreclosure. 

Home Equity as Low Interest Rate Credit

It’s an often-asked question: Should I pay off my credit cards with a home equity loan or home equity line of credit (HELOC)? Also, many people may be wondering if it’s better to pay for a home improvement, like a kitchen renovation, using a credit card, a store-sponsored credit card, or the equity in their home.

It would be great if the answers to these questions were simple, but they aren’t. Interest rates change daily, introductory rates are offered, and payment terms and conditions can have a big impact on what makes the most sense.

Under normal conditions, rates for credit cards, and especially store-sponsored credit cards, tend to be higher than rates associated with home equity loans and lines of credit. Under these circumstances, you may want to review the benefits of home equity to consolidate debt or for use for home improvement projects.

A QUICK OVERVIEW

A home equity loan, sometimes called a second mortgage, is a lump sum loan based on the equity you’ve built up in your home. It can be particularly helpful if you have imperfect credit, and offers a fixed interest rate and a variety of amortizations periods so that you can pay back your debt under favorable terms.

A home equity line of credit (HELOC) is different from a home equity loan in that you withdraw money from your account as you need it, rather than taking out a loan in a lump sum. In addition, a HELOC is revolving debt, like a credit card. You can borrow up to a specific credit limit and interest is charged on the amount borrowed. You can pay your debt down and then borrow again when you need to during the draw term, which is usually between five and 10 years. A home appraisal may be required to obtain a HELOC.